Accountable Care Organizations: Regulation and Organization

Accountable Care Organizations: Regulation

and Organization

Sponsor

California Attorney General

Principle Investigator

Dr. Richard Scheffler, PhD

Dates

September 1, 2013 – August 31, 2015

About

Project Overview

In 2013, Dr. Richard Scheffler and the Petris Center on Health Care Markets and Consumer Welfare were awarded support from the Attorney General Kamala Harris’ office to examine regulatory approaches for and market impacts of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). The two year project included:

  • Two ACO workshops hosted at the University of California, Berkeley;
  • A special issue of the Journal of Health Policy, Politics, and Law; and
  • A report on the regulation of commercial ACOs, to be co-published with the Milbank Memorial Foundation.
Project Summary: Year One

In the first year of the project, the Petris Center convened the Spring 2014 Accountable Care Organization Workshop at the University of California, Berkeley and published a special issue of the Journal of Health Policy, Politics and Law on Accountable Care Organizations.

Project Summary: Year Two

In the second year of the project, the Petris Center convened the Spring 2015 Accountable Care Organization Workshop at the University of California, Berkeley and completed a comprehensive policy report on the regulation of ACOs, which will be co-published with the Milbank Memorial Foundation in the Fall of 2015.

The Petris Center report, State Actions to Promote and Restrain Commercial ACOs, presents and discusses regulations and actions states can take to either promote the development or restrain the actions of ACOs in the commercial sector. Part 1 of this report draws on evidence from the literature and four case studies to outline tools that state governments can use to promote the potential benefits of ACOs while mitigating their potential risks. In Part 2, we apply these lessons to a large state with a rapidly growing ACO market: California. This part outlines policy guidelines for regulators and antitrust enforcement agencies in the state seeking to promote or restrain ACOs.

Advisory Committee

Deborah Feinstein – Director, FTC Bureau of Competition

Kathleen Foote – Senior Assistant Attorney General and Antitrust Chief in the California Attorney General’s Office

H.E. (Ted) Frech III – Professor of Economics at the University of California Santa Barbara

Martin Gaynor – Director, FTC Bureau of Economics

Deborah Haas-Wilson – Marilyn Carlson Nelson Professor of Economics at Smith College

Ben Handel – Assistant Professor of Economics at University of California, Berkeley

Patrick Kuhlmann – Antitrust Division, U.S. Department of Justice

Peter Mucchetti  – Chief, Litigation I Section, Antitrust Division, U.S. Department of Justice

Richard Scheffler – Distinguished Professor, Health Economics and Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley

Stephen Shortell – Blue Cross of California Distinguished Professor of Health Policy & Management, Professor of Organization Behavior

Emilio Varanini – Deputy Attorney General in the Antitrust Section of the California Attorney General’s Office

Staff

Brent Fulton, PhD – Assistant Adjunct Professor of Health Economics and Public Policy, University of California Berkeley

Ann Hollingshead – Graduate Student, Masters of Public Policy, University of California Berkeley

Beth Keolanui – Graduate Student, Masters of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley

Eric Kessell, PhD – Policy Analyst, Berkeley Forum, University of California Berkeley

Vishaal Pegany  – Graduate Student, Masters of Public Health and Public Policy, University of California Berkeley

Kati Phillips – Program Manager, Nicholas C. Petris Center, University of California, Berkeley

Joshua Rushakoff – Medical Student, UCSF

Christopher Whaley – PhD Candidate, Health Services and Policy Analysis, University of California Berkeley